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situation room" this week. >>> and a tense situation today along the india/pakistan border. at least one pakistani soldier has died in the conflict that's flared up in the kashmir region. i spoke to our produce anywhere pakistan earlier and she is saying that indian troops crossed into pakistani territory. >> as far as the pakistani military is concerned, they have reacted in the sense that they have obviously made this public. apparently according to a pakistani military official, the two countries have hot lines set up between them, that includes the military as well as the diplomatic officers and those conversations are expected to happen in the coming days. >>> the indian defense ministry says pakistani troops opened fire first on indian posts in the indian-controlled part of kashmir. >>> we know more now about the standoff yesterday at a home in aurora, colorado. two women and two men, including the alleged gunman died in the incident. police say a woman who escaped from the house told them she had seen three bodies inside. authorities also tried to subdue the suspect with tear gas.
on the disgrace, the fall of lance armstrong. >>> also following international stories. pakistan's government under fire on two fronts. first the supreme court ordered the arrest of the country's prime minister, number of officials over corruption allegations. the second, you've got protesters they have filled streets of the capital in islamabad. they are on the main boulevard leading up to the president's residence, the national assembly and the supreme court led by a muslim cleric, thousands of people are calling for pakistan's leaders to be thrown out in favor of a caretaker government. i want to bring in and get more from sima. if you could, explain to us why the unrest in pakistan now? why do they want the prime minister to step down? >> reporter: well, suzanne, this is an embattled government right now, seemingly out of nowhere the protests erupted the muslim cleric from canada returned to pakistan calling for a million man march and on the same day the supreme court, which had been looking into allegations of kickbacks regarding two years ago in 2011 now has ordered the government forc
to be there in 2020? you know? >> the place that you're looking at is very close to pakistan and that's where the insurgents are coming from. they take safe harbor in pakistan. was there talk about how at the end, that is the crux of the problem. you are never going to be able to destroy this insurgency because it houses itself and gets replenished in a foreign country. >> all the time. in fact, pakistan is mentioned so many more times in the book than bin laden or al qaeda. it's like, you know, the enemy that dare not speak its name for the u.s. they do what they can do. obviously, the drone wars are being fought independent and separate in many ways. but, it's not just weapons and bad guys that are coming over the border, it's expertise. it's sharp shooters and snipers and people who teach the locals how to build ieds. >> the thing that struck me about this is because all great stories about war often get, make you understand the disconnect between the very grand plan strategies at the top, even at the level of general mcchrystal and company and what it translates into for the guy. on the g
, a different kind of mission? those who are in the pakistan, particularly the safe havens that are in pakistan, what kind of police will you have? thank you. >> the mission will be fundamentally different. just to repeat, our main reason should we have troops in afghanistan post 2014 at the invitation of the afghan government, will be to make sure that we are training, assisting and advising afghan security forces, who have now taken the lead for and are responsible for security throughout afghanistan, and an interest that the united states has, the very reason we went to afghanistan in the first place, and that is to make sure that al qaeda and its affiliates cannot launch an attack against the united states or other countries from afghan soil. we believe that we can achieve that mission in a way that is very different from the very active presence that we have had in afghanistan over the last 11 years. president karzai emphasized the strains that u.s. troop presences in afghan villages, for example, have created. well, that's not going to be a strain that exists if there is a follow-up opera
with mohammed more soint situation room this week. >>> a tense situation today along the bored we are pakistan and india. at least one pakistani soldier has died in the violence that flared up in the kashmir region. there are conflicting reports of the incident, with both sides blaming the other. i spoke to our producer in pakistan earlier. she reports that pakistan is saying that indian troops crossed into pakistani territory. >> as far as the pakistani military is concerned, they have reacted in the sense that they have obviously made this public, apparently according to a pakistani military official, the two countries have hard lines set up between them that includes the military as well as the diplomatic office and those conversations are expected to happen in the coming days. >> the indian defense minute stare says pakistani troops opened fire on the indian posts in the indian-controlled part of kashmir. >>> still to come, we expect to learn a lot more this week about last summer's mass shooting inside of the movie near the colorado. >>> and then later, my conversation with one of notre d
weapon. pakistan is probably building more nuclear weapons than any other country in the world. pakistan is a very fragile system that can disintegrate at any time. we're not prepared for that. the whole challenge of the persian gulf, we're not prepared for that. i think it's accurate to say that by appointing the secretary of state and the secretary of defense that he has, john kerry and hagel, they're communicating accurately the minimalist approach to the world. you can make a case for that. but neither, neither of them nor the president has a positive vision of how you're going to deal with a worldwide virus that is increasingly destabilizing the planet. and that's what's happening from pakistan through north africa to syria and i think potentially in europe and the united states. >> i have less than a minute here. i need one-word answers from you. joe biden made a bit of a slip up talking about how hap he was going to be president of the united states. >> joe biden would be happy to be president of the united states and i think he is planning to run, if possible. >> quickly. >> i th
, pakistan certainly has taken out a whole codry of leadership. what we are seeing now are people who have migrated back to other parts of the world where they came from, primarily, who are, in effect, affiliates. part of the jihadist syndicate, like maghreb uses that name. the fact is, they are terrorists, they are extremists. they have designs on overthrowing existing governments, even these new islamist governments of controlling territory. so although there has been the decimation of core al qaeda in the afghanistan/pakistan region, we do have to contend with the wannabes and affiliates going forward. >> thank you, madam. >> thank you, mr. chairman and thank you, madam secretary for being here and it's great to see you today. you have been, i think, a real and dedicated public servant for this country and your travels around the world as many here have talked about it, the million miles that you have put on and all the countries you visited and i think you've been to many countries where they've never had a secretary of state and i've seen firsthand when i've been to many of these coun
in the head by taliban militants because she demanded equal education for girls in pakistan, here is better news. nearly three months later she is walking out of a hospital and looking healthy and happy. matthew chance has more in this report. >> reporter: holding the hand of a nurse, malala made her own way out of the hospital where she has been treated for her truittmatic injuries and managed to wave at staff as she was discharged. a hospital statement said she is a strong young woman and has worked hard with the people caring for her to make excellent progress in her recovery. doctors say she may benefit from being with her family but may need to be readmitted for reconstructive surgery on her skull. from the age of 11 malala has been an outspoken campaigner for female education in pakistan criticizing the taliban who ban schooling for girls. she was shot in the head and neck in october after her school bus was stopped by taliban gun men who demanded the other children identify her. the attack outraged pakistan provoking cause for a crack down on ilitants and made malala an international
in his home of pakistan with "one more fish" hocking snapper at queens market in london. >> and so you like this? >> i do. feeling it. >> psy says he doesn't want to sing gangnam style anymore. >> instead of what? what's his other hit? >> he has nothing. >> "one pound fish" okay. >>> was it one small fbi for neil armstrong? >> that's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. >> a new documentary suggests that armstrong may have lied when he said he ad libed that famous line when he became the first man to step foot on the room. in a recent interview, armstrong's brother claimed that he thought up the famous line months before the july 16th apollo mission and that he was supposed to say a man not just man. >>> some people were shocked when they thought they saw superman flying over the coast. here's jeanne moos. >> he may look like a man of steel but he's actually the man of lightweight foam. actually his top speed is 30 miles an hour. but the sight of superman flying above the california coast was enough to make a cyclist stop and shoot it. the video went viral. and now peopl
. >>> pakistan says indian troops attacked a military post today killing one soldier. indian's army is accuse offend crossing the border in kashmir which is known as the line of control between pakistan and india. a pakistani military statement said fighting continues in the region. >>> retired general stanley mcchrystal is speaking out for the first time since he resigned more than two years ago. in his new memoir he accepts blame for a "rolling stone" article that ended his career and also questions the article's fairness and accuracy. he was the top commander in afghanistan when he resigned and stepped down after the article quoted his aides criticizing president obama's team, including vice president biden. >>> those are your headlines "reliable sources" is at the top of the hour and now back to fareed zakaria "gps. quaes. >>> shame, elation, confusion, irstation, disbelief. those were just some of the emotions americans felt this week as they watched the painful process of democracy in action or in inaction as they went over the fiscal cliff. i was in london. i was furious how it all loo
injuries she sustained. it's interesting, that question, because over the past couple of days, the pakistan government has announced it's given a job to malala yousafzai's dad, the job as the education attache in the pakistani consulate in birmingham, which is right where the hospital is. and that's for the next three years. malala obviously has to go through a lot of treatment, so that enables the family at least temporarily to stay in britain for the next three years. even though the father says ultimately he wants to go back to pakistan, there is this huge threat hanging over his family. the taliban say still they're going to finish off the job, as it were, they're still going to try to kill malala yousafzai if she goes back. so my suspicion is she may stay there for a significant period of time. >> along those lines, what is the security or protection for her, given this vow by the taliban to continue to try and find her and kill her? >>> a "360 follow" now. the u.s. supreme court today agreed to decide who will get to raise this little girl. her name is veronica. she's 3 years old and
. pakistan started firing first, but pakistan accuses indian troops of crossing the line of control. >>> in france, a french moroccan family of five flying to morocco were killed when their plane crashed near the french alps. the cause is not clear to investigators, but emergency workers responded quickly after a resident report othe crash. >> around 1:00 p.m., we felt a big shake. the crash happened just below my house. at the beginning, i did not know what it was. we found out after firemen arrived that it was a plane crash. we did not see the wreckage. >> the family had been returning to morocco after spending their holiday in the french alps. >>> he dresses madonna, katie holmes and jennifer lopez and is a favorite of stars from new york to hollywood, but now he is missing. the plane carrying italian fashion mogul vittorio missoni and his wife friday disappeared off the coast of venezuela. the missoni brand known for its multi-color zigzag design has been known. joining me for much more on this, nadia. there are reports he was headed back home to italy possibly to unveil new des
suddenly without warning. the drone strike which killed several militants in pakistan's rugged tribal area is causing new controversy. jill dougherty has details for us. what's going on some. >> wolf, u.s. official now is confirming the death of that key warlord. he is not saying how he died but he does say that he and his men were directly responsible for planning and carrying out cross border attacks on coalition forces in afghanistan as well as providing protection for al qaeda forces in pakistan. pakistani intelligence officials tell cnn what they believe was a u.s. drone has killed a key pakistani taliban commander in south waziristan. pakistani warlord who sent his men to afghanistan to fight u.s. and nato troops. the pentagon is not confirming his death but senior officials are calling reports that he died a major development. nazeer, they say, had a lot of blood on his hands. george little, pemt gone spokesman said, any time a bad guy has a bad day, it's a good day for us. but in pakistan, fury over the killing. a man who played both sides. >> he was one of the top commanders of th
died in that strike. it happened in pakistan's volatile tribal region in the province of south wazirstan. pakistani officials say the men were among 15 killed today in drone attacks. u.s. officials insists the use of unmanned aircraft with missiles is successful on to fight terrorist elements, but human rights groups says the number of civilians killed is too high. peter bergen joins us from washington. tell us about how the obama administration has relied on these drone strikes and what they've been able to accomplish. >> well, they've killed 37 leaders of al qaeda and the taliban, but they've also in the process killed hundreds of others. there's a controversy about how many civilians. i work at a foundation called the new america foundation where we track it carefully. we calculate there were five civilian deaths in 2012. that's not dissimilar to the accounts of other organizations that count these things. the civilian death toll has dropped remarkably in the last several years. in the 2004-2007 time frame it was about 60%. the reason is better intelligence, drones that fly
people killed in two suspected u.s. drone attacks in a volatile region of pakistan. that commander was said to be at odds with the pakistani taliban over the peace agreement he signed with the government in 2007. as part of the deal he refused to attack pakistani military tar goats, but he is believed to be behind a number of attacks that attacked the u.s. military. two of his deputies were believed to be killed in that strike. >>> the u.n. estimates that the death toll in syria is now beyond 60,000. 15,000 higher than estimates cnn had gone with. and that number will likely continue to rise as attacks like these persist. an opposition group says 207 people were killed in war-related violence yesterday alone. most of them in damascus and suburbs, others in aleppo. cnn cannot independently verify these numbers. >>> the family of james foley, missing in syria since new year's day, is launching a public campaign to find him. global post, a news website foley published for, said he was driving to the border with turkey when he was intercepted by a car. he was forced out of the vehicle
, pakistan, iraq, afghanistan. >> right. >> certainly qualified to talk about matters of foreign relations, and he says chuck hagel is a statesman, and america has few of them. he knows the leaders of the world and their issues. at a time when bipartisanship is hard to find in washington, he personifies it. above all, he has an unbending focus on u.s. national security, from his service in vietnam decades ago to his current position on the intelligence advisory council. mr. hagel would run the defense department. it would not run him. what is -- you know as a senator, you say lots of things that make people angry. >> yeah. >> you've done that yourself, and it -- it has a long record. you can go back. >> absolutely. >> but for now and for here why isn't chuck hagel the man? should the president nominate him? >> well, it's a controversial choice. ryan crocker truly is a diplomat in the best sense of the word. i like chuck hagel. he served with distinguish in vietnam, an enlisted man, two purple hearts, but quite frankly chuck hagel is out of the mainstream of thinking i believe on most issue
pakistan and yemen. that's likely to be a topic of conversation in the brennan hearing. the bureau of investigative journalism estimate that is american drones have killed as many as 171 civilians in yemen since 2002. the real story is in pakistan where nearly 1,000 people have been killed, civilians, since 2004 by american drones. >> secretary of state hillary clinton is back at work after being hospitalized for three days. after doctors found a blood clot in between her skull and brain. the staff welcomed her back to work today with fitting gifts. a football helmet, a jersey with the the 112, which symbolizes the number of countries she's visited as secretary of state. even if clinton's blood clot is still present, dr. david deaton tells "outfront" it can be regulated with medication. >>> and an "outfront" update on a story we have been following. french actor gerard depardieu met with french president vladimir putin over the weekend. the president gave him a passport and he was reportedly offered a job, i'm not joking here, to be cultural minister, but apparently he declined. he
country elsewhere. >> right. although, when that didn't matter in pakistan, when they went after osama bin laden. the united states seems to go in when they want to go in. >> you know, in a situation like pakistan, where they took unilateral action, they were afraid, obviously, that the grade would have been compromised, had they let the local government know. this is a different situation now, and we've been working closely with the algerians, and i don't expect that this would be a unilateral type of situation. but as my colleague was saying, i know the offers are on the table, that, you know, any resources that can be brought to bear, to help the algerians resolve this thing are going to be readily available. >> all right. >> and this is a situation, quite frankly, that we might have been able to see coming. the person that was actually bearing responsibility for this, mokhtar belmokhtar actually made a video about a month ago saying, attacks are coming, expect it. so in essence, we should have been circling the wagons, expecting something like this to happen. >> all right. well, don an
either. look at pakistan where the president has gone all-in on drones six times more attacks by drones under president obama than under george w. bush. pakistanis, 94% of them think drones kill innocent people. what do we get out of this? >> here's the trade-off. the problem is, this part of africa is one of the big problem spots for the u.s. intelligence community. i travel with general carter hamm, head of the military's africa command, this month and he told me this is one of the real blind spots for u.s. intelligence agencies. they don't have good ways of collecting intelligence. they don't have good spy networks on the ground. so introducing these drones will get a head start on trying to monitor some of these militant networks including the al qaeda affiliate there. >> people might say who cares about drones. lot of people in this country say look, we don't want to risk american lives. if we're going to have to fly over and kill quote, unquote bad guys with drones, so be it. let's do it. there are people on the left and the right who agree about that. they say what about the paki
' education in her native pakistan. it is remarkable, though, and very heartwarming, isn't it, to see these images of malala, the 15-year-old girl, walking away almost unaided, holding the hand of a nurse, in the hospital. she even had the strength to wave to the staff that has been looking after her over the course of the past three months or so since she was evacuated from pakistan with the terrible head injuries. she's going to be located at her temporary home. her family have moved over from pakistan to birmingham in central england near to the hospital. she's going to be going back with her father and mother and two younger brothers. the doctors at the hospital say that will be best for her, but she'll still come back and forth from the hospital to get clinical treatment and she'll also have to be re-admitted according to the hospital as well for cranial reconstruction surgery. her skull was obviously smashed by the bullet that was fired into her head by the taliban gunmen back in october and she still has to undergo a lot of surgery to, you know, kind of make that damage good, s
and articulating for women to be educated all over pakistan. there's a problem with that. that's going to continue. she's gathered hundreds of thousands of people that signed petitions calling for her to be given the nobel peace prize. that's how much of an impact this girl has had around the world. >> what about the folks, the extremists who tried to kill her? were they ever caught? was anybody brought to justice? >> the pakistani authorities say that they've been rounding up the people they believe are responsible in terms of the trigger men. but the people who issued the ortds, the taliban leadership pakistan and afghanistan, obviously they haven't been brought to justice. what the taliban has said is that it will try again to kill mala malala because of her continued comments regarding educate. the death threat is not lifted. >> does she have security? are people trying to protect her and her family to make sure they don't get to her? >> i'm sure there are. they're not very visible, but the british security sfts is aware of the threat against her. there have been threats against her life and t
the program perhaps in yemen, pakistan and other hot areas? >> suzanne, as you know, the principle architect, arguably, in yemen. he has traveled to yemen several times since the christmas day attempt in yemen to bring down u.s. flight over detroit. in the foundation that i work, new america foundation, in addition to cnn, we track that and we find that pakistan is going down rather dramatically, compared to 2010. it's expanding rapidly in yemen. one strike two years ago and there were probably -- at least 46 in this past year. so, he has presided over this policy. surely, it will be a topic at his nomination, whether you think of it negatively or positively. >> do you think it will have an impact by people who say this is not the way of doing things, going to war and going after terrorists? >> i doubt it, suzanne. i think there's broad support for this in general in washington and in congress. dealing most directly with the drones is satisfied in her own mind and has said publicly that the drones don't kill a lot of civilians, there's a great deal of caretaken with this. bro broadly speakin
the last years we have become accustomed to operating in dangerous places, in pakistan, in iraq, excuse me, in afghanistan, and yemen and elsewhere. and we do, as by necessity, rely on security professionals to implement the protocols and procedures necessary to keep our people safe. and as i said in my opening statements, i have a lot of confidence in them because, you know, most of the time they get it right. but i was also engaged, and i think this is what deputy secretary byrnes was referring to, in the issues related to the deteriorating threat environment, particularly in libya, there were other places across the region, we were also watching, to try to see what we could do, to support the libyan government to improve the overall stability of their country, to deal with the many militias, we have many programs and actions that we were working on. i had a number of conversations with leading libyan officials. i went to libya in october of 2011, and in fact shortly before the attack on benghazi, we approved libya for substantial funding from a joint state dod account for border securit
in afghanistan and spread to iraq and is in yemen and pakistan and other places. we tend to understand that when soldiers go to war, they die in service to our country and we're grateful that they do that. once the conflict ends, we're left with fragile states with challenging situations and poor, weak governments and that's the construct that chris stevens willingly walked into because he understood that as we see a libya or egypt or tunisia or yemen move forward, the united states has to be there. while there were mistakes made and underestimations, we can't reduce it to zero. chris stevens understood the situation in benghazi better than anyone else and decided to be there and we should be grateful for his service and his sacrifice. >> the biggest mistake was putting susan rice on that sunday morning on television with what turned out to be wrong intelligence when they didn't need to go that fast. that's probably as much the media's fault for demanding that they do that kind of thing. i think everyone is culpable here. let's take a break and we'll come back and talk about two more hot button
, pakistan, vietnam. on and on. >> that earns one the platinum card when it comes to flying, i spoiz. they do talk about her, the hillary doctrine. and this great secretary of state, but what can she point to specifically as her accomplishments in that role? >> well, she promoted smart power, meaning after george w. bush and the iraq war sending troops abroad. finding other ways to achieve goals in the war on terror. she's largely been the voice of the women's movement around the world. talking about democracy and women's issues. she's beloved by feminists and holds a feminist role of global stature and i think most significantly in the end she is just very well liked by presidents and prime ministers and our own u.s. military. i mean, talk to the generals and talk to the admirals. they all have great respect for her. she has promoted the internet and facebook, twitter as tools in diplomacy and foreign policy making, probably more than any other person working in our government. >> sounds like a very modern secretary of state but does come at a price in benghazi and that hearing she had where
, mostly targeting leaders in pakistan. president obama took office and increased the number of targets and expanded the target into yemen why where al qaeda was planning attacks and into lawless somalia. they have been working together in the areas and over the next years, officials want to specifically grow the partnership between intel and special operations forces. >> it is central to our ability to solve our most pressing security challenges. >> perhaps the most pressing is a cyber attack that disrupts services across the states. >> these could be a signer pearl harbor and cause physical destruction and the loss of life. >> it may not be physical destruction, but fiscal. computers crashing and files erased and bank accounts cleaned out. experts say the obama administration needs to do more work to defend american companies. >> we need to worry about the terrorists becoming interested because it's not hard or the nation states that are less responsible. deciding it's time to play a little more aggressive. >> the president's former national security adviser said right now there is no
we see in pakistan and other places. also in north africa and yemen sometimes when they fire the missiles and take out targets from the air. these are going to be just for surveillance, out there gathering intelligence. the thing you are talking about in this neighborhood is it is hard to have human intelligence. the cia has a network of people that give them information. in this part of the world, in this neighborhood, they don't. they have little intel. the drones will be up there looking for movements of groups they are worried about. >> do we think there is significant numbers of al qaeda in niger? >> in the neighborhood. this is the concern in mali. what happened in the north when the al qaeda linked groups, the islamists came over to take over what was a separatist regime at the time and hijacked it, you have groups spread across this area that encompasses many countries. you can see they are starting to work together. that worries a lot of people. >> i don't know if you can answer this question. how much does this pose a direct threat to us here in the united states wh
. >>> as you drone attack killed 17 suspected militants in pakistan's tribal region today that strike near the afghan border injured three, according to intelligence sources. it follows two similar attacks last week, one of which killed a taliban commander. >>> 130 trained mountain rescuers are combing a five-mile area east of seattle. they are looking for this man, 29-year-old curt rupert of lake city, florida. he disappeared three days ago during a skydiving trip. friends say they last saw rupert jump when he -- rather when he jumped out of a helicopter above the cascade mountains. authorities still hoping to find him alive. they say his parachute may have snagged a tree on the way down. >>> and cnn has learned that tomorrow, president obama will announce chuck hagel as his nominee to be defense secretary. the former senator from nebraska is a vietnam war hero and served on capitol hill for more than a decade but his confirmation process isn't expected to be smooth. athena jones is at the white house and hagel, athena, has angered some lawmakers, many because of the positions he has take
see along the afghan/pakistan border. >> the can of worms is open. if we can't put the can back on how much involvement are you willing to stomach? are you willing to say we will put boots on the ground, something the obama administration does not want to do and the american people do not want to do right now? >> you have to ask. there are a whole series of options here that we can put into play. and it has to be a coordinated effort. this isn't just about mali. the french have very capable special forces. they are going to put hurt on these folks. there are things we can do for them short of boots on the ground. i would encourage the president to continue to do that. if you -- this is going to get worse. you cannot allow this to become a national security issue for the united states. i argue it has crossed that threshold. this area now attracting jihadists and they are really good at this stuff including hostage taking because they have been doing it for decades and have been the largest funder to al qaeda. this is a problem we have to deal with. we all ought to sit down and try to co
leaders in pakistan. then, president obama took office and increased the number of targets. he expanded the program into yemen where al qaeda was planning attacks on the u.s. and into lawless somalia. the pentagon and cia have been working together in those areas and over the next four years official want to specifically grow the partnership between intel and special operations forces. >> the central to our ability to solve the most pressing national security challenges. >> reporter: perhaps the most pressing? a cyber attack that disrupts communication and transportation and vital services across multiple states. >> these kinds of attacks could be a sign of pearl harbor, an attack could tha would cause physical destruction and the loss of life. >> reporter: it may not even be fiscal destruction, but physical. the obama administration needs to do more work with the private sector. >> what we need to worry about are either the terrorists suddenly becoming interests because it's not that hard or some of the nation states that are less responsible, like iran deciding that it's time to play
more point then have the talking stick as long as you want. >> in iran, in pakistan, in afghanistan, rape is a conscious tool of sub, the third point and one we should give real thought to is the stress on military families. we already lose a lot of officers at the major level because of the strained families. for those military spouses who are not in combat, this is one more reason to worry about the high rate of family break up that we already see among military personnel. >> david, forgive me, i think you're dead wrong on all those points. on the last, you're absolutely right. there's been a lot of strain on military families. the solution is not to deny women the opportunity to serve in combat positions, the solution is to rejigger the personal system to do a better job of making sure families do not have two parents at risk at the same time. on the issue of rape, if a woman is willing to assume the risk, just as our men in combat will assume that risk, it's not up to us to say you're not allowed. it's a risk men take, too. and on the issue of standards dropping, wow, i think it
to sent u.s. personnel in. the increase of drones in pakistan, somalia, yemen. >> first of all, they are extraordinarily effective and a tool we have to have. we need to use them for reconnaissance and to strike. every time you take a shot, you need to do a calculation, and i think we've done that in the past. the effect it has around the target and it emanates further. if you look in a place that is a sovereign country. if we need in and technolog technologicaltechnologi technologically shoot, it was pretty easy. we didn't put american boots on the ground or accept risk. it can lower the threshold to take action. at the receiving end, it feels very different. >> it feels like war because civilians get killed. >> look, i've washed this since the program stepped up in mid 2008 and it got stronger as time went on. now, i would suggest to you in 2008, we were very much focussed on what were clearly imminent threats against the homeland. we saw what was going on inside al qaeda training camps. for that period of time and a period of time afterward, that was a compelling concern. th
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to securing our building and protecting our people. the state has this authority through afghanistan, pakistan, and iraq. we're also looking at where contracting may be appropriate for certain securitity related contacts. hiring equipment and diplomatic security personnel, and authorizing full funding for the embassy construction capital cost sharing program. it was created in the after math of the 1998 bombings that resulted in 224 deaths including 11 american citizens. the the first year, it funded the construction of 13 facilities, and nine in 2005. nearly every year since, fewer facilities have been built than in the previous year due to both funding decreases and the fact that the allocations have never been indexed. costs have riseen tremendously. the department estimate it's will be able to construct just three new facilities, spite the fact that there are a couple dozen posts that are high risk posts that need replacing right now. the lest sons are not about only adequately resourcing our relations. within the department itself, among all of the agencies engaged in international work,
that started in afghanistan, spread to iraq, and is in yemen, pakistan, other places. we tend to understand that when soldiers go to war soldiers die in the service of our country and we're ever so grateful that they do that. but once the conflict ends, we're left with fragile states with challenging situations and poor, weak governments. and that's the construct that chris stevens willily walked into because he understood that as we see a libya or an egypt or a a tunisia or a yemen move forward the united states has to be there. and while there were mistakes made, there were underestimations the of the threat posed to that temporary diplomatic facility, at the same time we can never reduce the risk to zero. >> right. >> i think we should respect the fact that chris stevens understood the situation in benghazi better than anyone else and he was the one who ultimately decided to be there and we should be grateful for his service and his sacrifice. >> the biggest mistake was putting susan rice on that sunday morning on television with what turned out to be wrong intelligence when they didn't
constructive support from across the region including pakistan. we welcome recent steps that have been taken in that regard and we'll look for more tangible steps because a stable and secure afghanistan is in the interests not only the afghan people and the united states but of the entire region. and finally we reaffirmed the strategic part they are shnersh last year. this includes deepening ties of trade, commerce, strengthening institutions, development, education, and opportunities for all afghans. men and women, boys and girls. and this sends a clear message to afghans and to the regions as afghans stand up, they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. now, let me close by saying that this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and make tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces still need to grow stronger. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governance and development that delivers for the afghan people. and an end t
of pakistan. criticizing the taliban who banned schooling for girls. she was shot in the head and neck and october after her school bus was stopped by taliban gunmen who demand the other children identify her. it provoked calls for a crack down on militants. she was evacuated to britain for medical treatment and an international symbol of courage. hundreds of thousands signed a petition and awarded the nobel peace prize. >> they are subjected to violence all the time and speaking out about their rights, she was a child speaking out about her rights in a very, very difficult context. she spoke how knowing that she could be subjected to violence, what makes it even more interesting is that she had the support of her family, particularly her father to actually speak out. >> the focus is on her first steps. her father has been given a job at pakistan's consulate allowing the family to stay in britain for the years of therapy and medical treatment. that now lies ahead. that job is for a period of at least three years with the possibility of an extension after that according to officials. th
, the footprint or the cape bill peas we have in other theaters. after years of focusing on pakistan and afghanistan, the map has changed. from mali to algeria, niger, libya, and egypt, the obama administration is struggling to catch up. u.s. intelligence is now working with france whose own spy networks are more established in the former french colonies in africa. and the u.s. will set up a base in niger to fly over safe havens, hoping to catch terrorists before there is a direct threat to the u.s.'s homeland. >> i'm not ruling it out. we take al qaeda wherever they are very seriously and we are not going to rest on our laurels until we find that kind of specific and credible information. >> one thing that has officials very concerned, terrorists operating in africa have u.s., western, european, canadian pass sports that can travel readily and come back to their home countries and it may be very difficult to catch their movements, especially if they are plotting more attacks. wolf? >> very difficult indeed. barbara, thanks very much. let's take a closer look right now at these lates
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